Archive for the ‘News’ Category

NAM PA MALICK CEESAY REMANDED FOR ALLEGED ECONOMIC CRIME

April 14, 2015
Reads :955

PA M CEESAY AT THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

PA M CEESAY AT THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Kibaaro News has been reliably informed that National Assembly Member for Lower Saloum, Hon. Pa Malick Ceesay, has been arrested and remanded for purportedly committing economic crime. As we go to press, Pa Malick Ceesay, a one time stout supporter of Dictator Yahya Jammeh and National Assembly Member for Lower Saloum is in the net of the notorious NIA. Early last year, Hon Ceesay had his membership of the Public Accounts Committee and Public Enterprise Committee (PAC/PEC) terminated. In a letter addressed to Hon Ceesay, the National Assembly said it terminated his membership because his “conduct has been found to be grossly out of order and unacceptable.” The letter fell short in shedding light on what the supposed “unacceptable” conduct was but when on to state that  Hon Ceesay’s membership of PAC/PEC “was terminated with effect from Thursday 29th January 2014.”

A source close to the estranged NAM disclosed to Kibaaro that Mr Ceesay foresaw his arrest days after he received his membership termination letter signed by the Clerk of the National Assembly, D.C.M Kebbeh. The same source added “the National Assembly received a complaint against Hon Ceesay, from the Joint Session PAC/PEC, at its meeting on Thursday, 29th January 2014.”  Now it appears that Pa Malick Ceesay has landed into the Dictator Jammeh’s trap.  He charged with seven counts of economic crimes and is remanded at the notorious NIA headquarters in Banjul.

 

Hon Pa Malick Ceesay’s scenario speaks volumes on how President Jammeh treat lawmakers of the Gambia. His family is worried that he will not only be denied due process of the law but he will be subjected to gruesome torture while in the hands of the NIA helping them in their investigation.

FATOU DRAMMEH, WHO WAS DETAINED FOR MORE THAN 2 YEARS WITHOUT CHARGE, CRIES FOUL OVER HER PRISON CONDITION

April 12, 2015
Reads :3372
FATOU DRAMMEH

FATOU DRAMMEH

Kibaaro News has received dependable information that the Gambian security has released a long time detained suspect, Fatou Drammeh, who was allegedly arrested in suspicion of secretly thrashing government information to Gambian online media houses in the diaspora and Gambia’s ex-military officers in abroad. A team of NIA undercover operatives arrested Fatou Drammeh on 27 June, 2012 and kept her incommunicado.

Fatou, a staff of the record office in Banjul, started having problems when her junior staff at work constantly talked about tribalism and how soon all enemies of President Jammeh would be fired especially those secretly supporting the Mandinka UDP Party.  Fatou, known for her steadfastness in promoting unity at her work, confronted her junior staff that she would not allow politics and discussion of discrimination in her office. She was reported to the authorities by one of her juniors it is believed. On 27th June, 2012 the Gambia’s fearful National Intelligent Agency picked up madam Drammeh from home and her two children at about 21:15 PM local time. The NIA officers who arrested her were all in plain clothes with one informer, who is a lady, and personally known to Fatou. She phoned Fatou on her mobile phone asking if she was home as she needed to see her urgently for personal reason while the NIA officers were waiting in an unidentified car.

The NIA officers waiting in the car came out and approach Fatou and said to her that she was wanted at the NIA headquarters in Banjul to answer some security questions. They refused to tell her what exactly was going on apart from “you will know when we arrived at the head office”. Her mobile phone was confiscated before their arrival in Banjul to prevent her from telling her family that she was detained. That was how she went missing for over two and half years. But out of the blue on the 8th of April, 20015 she was released on bail after her family coughed out D25, 000.00. The family then took her to Senegal for medical treatment but were warned by the NIA that she must return to report on bail or her surety will be arrested as she is to appear in court on 19 August 2015. Upon her release, Fabakary Drammeh, her father, spoke to one NIA officer, Salifu Nyassi, and he reiterated to him that the Gambia constitutional law limited detention without trial for any 72 hours and asked why his daughter and many Gambians are unlawfully detained for extended period of time without trial. Our investigation confirmed that in reply, the NIA officer told him, “decisions and orders are received from the top and they are merely doing what they are asked to do”.  Narrating her ordeal in prison to her family, tearful Fatou relived how she was “tortured, beaten up, and forced to confess. “I was denied access to legal counsel and subjected to all kinds of degrading human treatment in the prison”. “I went through Hell”, but I still kept firm because I know I had not done anything morally wrong and let justice guide our actions” she added choking in tears. Fatou is reported to have been sick while in detention but denied medical attention and her family was told that she was moved to a different detention centre which they were not allowed to disclose for security reason. Media coverage about her story was less copious due to family fear for her live and the gaping holes in the Gambia judicial system which is controlled and dictated by the President Yahya Jammeh.

The government set up a media commission to strength its control over the media in Gambia, but retaining far-reaching power to control Gambian online news papers. Legal battle continued between government and Gambia Press Union about imposing sanctions on journalists ranging from suspension of media houses to prison sentence. However, Gambian journalists are committed to professional journalism and media friendly society to promote and defend the rights and freedom of expression in Gambia which includes freedom of the media.

UDP LEADER UNLOCKS THE DANGEROUS LINKS BETWEEN CORRUPTION AND PERVASIVE HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE TO THE GROWING INFLUENCE OF INSECURITY ON POLITICS IN WEST AFRICA

April 12, 2015
Reads :397
UDP LEADER-LAWYER DARBOE

UDP LEADER-LAWYER DARBOE

The leader of the United Democratic Party (UDP) Lawyer Ousainou Darboe has warned West African leaders to curb corruption and pervasive human rights abuse if they are to be successful in combating the growing insecurity in West Africa. The UDP leader was speaking at a well-attended international confab of the Socialist International in the Malian capital of Bamako on April 10th 2015 where he presented a paper on: The growing influence of insecurity on politics in West Africa: Unlocking the dangerous links between insecurity and transnational crime, corruption, lack of respect for human rights and democratic governance in the region.

The UDP leader’s speech which was constantly interrupted by clapping and standing ovation, covered in detail, the underlining factors that promote insecurity in the region.

Insecurity fuelled by State sanctioned repression and rights abuses

Lawyer Darboe said in order to understand why there has been a rise in insecurity in West Africa, people have to look at the interconnectedness of other opportunistic factors that breed insecurity leading to their pervasive impact on politics generally.

He said “in many West African countries, there is hardly a distinction between the State and the ruling party. Quite often, ruling parties in their quest to remain in power, put in place deliberate policies in guise of protecting national security to systematically suppress dissent; muzzle freedom of expression and of the media; and deny citizens their basic and fundamental rights

“In some countries, a mere attempt by the opposition to organize political rallies at the very least, receive puzzle response from the authorities. In more severe cases, heavy handed security tactics are used to clamp down on the opposition as a deliberate ploy to distance the opposition from its constituent supporters” the UDP leader said.

He added that rule of law is also hardly respected characterized by a persistent disregard for the due process. “Electoral reforms that could bring about credible, transparent, free and fair elections are always frowned upon. Where they are put under pressure, ruling parties accept reforms that are only but cosmetic” Mr Darboe said attracting loud applause from the audience.

 “In such situations distinguish ladies and gentlemen, resentments against the established order are strong that normally translates into violent conflict and confrontation” Mr Darboe said.

 The twin evils of poverty and corruption

The UDP leader also dwelled on what he called “the twin evils of poverty and corruption” that contribute greatly to insecurity in West Africa, thereby affecting peaceful political conduct. Lawyer Darboe said: “Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, behind the competition for political dominance in the countries of West Africa, reveals some deep seated cowardly facades by the political class particularly those in charge of the nations’ coffers to perpetually keep the messes in poverty.

“Deliberately, some governments will even deny development programmes to their own citizens because they are deemed to be opposition supporters. In most of these communities, unemployment is unbearably high and they also lack the basic of opportunities. In addition, national resources are plundered and State coffers looted.”

 He added that in a situation where people lack hope and opportunities, and are deliberately downtrodden, they resort to measures that could have profound consequence on peace and security talk less of peaceful politicking.

Thus, Lawyer said, “the twin evils of poverty and corruption that our governments continue to perpetuate, are important factors that we should not ignore when we discuss politics and insecurity in West Africa.”

Conference delegates praised the UDP leader for well researched paper and they called on governments in the region and across Africa to take note of the issues raised in presentation in order to effectively tackle insecurity while at the same time guaranteeing political freedoms.

……………………………………….

Below is Lawyer Ousainou Darboe’s full speech.

…………………………………………..

Speech delivered by United Democratic Party leader Lawyer Ousainou Darboe of the Gambia during the SI Africa council meeting held in Bamako Mali.

Protocol: Mr Chairman, party leaders present here, distinguished delegates, ladies and gentlemen. I stand on existing protocols.

West Africa is witnessing a rebirth in the quest to establish sustainable democratic systems across the region.

From Senegal to Ghana; Ivory Coast to Benin and most recently Nigeria, tremendous successes are being registered where power changed hands through the ballot box. In some of these cases, opposition parties turned the tide by wresting power from ruling parties through keenly contested general elections. This goes to show that when the playing field is levelled, and the due process respected, victory can go either way. The recent electoral successes in Nigeria by the opposition All Progressive Congress is pointer to this. And let me take this opportunity to profoundly thank the people of Nigeria and indeed the APC party on their success in the just concluded general elections.

Mr Chairman, I am tasked to present a paper on “the influence of insecurity on the politics of West Africa.” I have tried as much to go beyond the academic exercise of this issue by bringing out the interconnectedness of other opportunistic factors that have direct bearing or shall I say that breed insecurity leading to pervasive impact on politics generally. They include:

The influence of State repression and lack of respect for due process and their attendant consequences on peaceful politics in the region:

In many West African countries, there is hardly a distinction between the State and the ruling party. Quite often, ruling parties in their quest to remain in power, put in place deliberate policies in guise of protecting national security to systematically suppress dissent; muzzle freedom of expression and of the media; and deny citizens their basic and fundamental rights.

In some countries, a mere attempt by the opposition to organize political rallies at the very least, receive puzzle response from the authorities. In more severe cases, heavy handed security tactics are used to clamp down on the opposition as a deliberate ploy to distance the opposition from its constituent supporters.

Independent journalism is also crushed and in some countries where even a free media flourishes, underhand tactics are deployed to starve the media of the much needed income to stay vibrant. This is always a deliberate attempt to suppress and keep the unsuspecting populace in the dark.

Rule of law is also hardy respected characterised by a persistent disregard for the due process. Electoral reforms that could bring about credible, transparent, free and fair elections are always frowned upon. Where they are put under pressure, ruling parties accept reforms that are only but cosmetic.

In such situations distinguish ladies and gentlemen, resentments against the established order are strong that normally translates into violent conflict and confrontation.

The twin evils of poverty and corruption:

Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, behind the competition for political dominance in the countries of West Africa, reveals some deep seated cowardly facades by the political class particularly those in charge of the nations’ coffers to perpetually keep the messes in poverty.

Deliberately, some governments will even deny development programmes to their own citizens because they are deemed to be opposition supporters. In most of these communities, unemployment is unbearably high and they also lack the basic of opportunities.

In addition, national resources are plundered and State coffers looted. In a situation where people lack hope and opportunities, and are deliberately downtrodden, they resort to measures that could have profound consequence on peace and security talk less of peaceful politicking.

Thus, the twin evils of poverty and corruption that our governments continue to perpetuate, are important factors that we should not ignore when we discuss politics and insecurity in West Africa.

Terrorism: A new shockwave that should serve as a wakeup call Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, West Africa, like other parts of the continent, is grappling with a new cancer that is feeding on the fallout from the unrestrained public corruption, poverty and state repression. From Mali to Niger, Mauritania to Nigeria, tragic as it were, Islamist insurgents are using our fault lines of ethnicity and religion as well as resentment against repressive regimes to recruit and turn our young people into potential jihadists and martyrs.

Terrorist networks and sleeper cells are capitalizing on our governments’ repressive and flourished corrupt practices as magnets to recruit our children who are consumed by hopelessness and lack of opportunities.

In some of the countries where our education systems especially Islamic education are left at the mercy of foreign benevolence, our children are being fed with new ideologies that are inimical to peaceful coexistence. The broken education systems caused by neglect and official corruption are becoming the new feeding points for recruitment.

In a situation where minimal state supervision and funding is provided to religious schools, their survival entirely deponent on outside funding by mainly charitable NGOs from countries whose curriculum is very much oriented on radical teachings.

And this is where the problem lies as far as the influence of terrorism among young people is concerned because from the very beginning, the children are brainwashed and taught certain principles that make them see the society differently.

Where young people are taught to despise the very political institutions and systems from the very beginning, they will certainly grow up to be handfuls.    Surviving on organized crimes.

 Organized crime is another serious concern in West Africa that is pushing new boundaries. Because of endemic corruption and weak governance prevalent in the region, organized criminal cartels are increasingly targeting West Africa for their illicit activities. And these cartels have found willing and unholy alliances among our security forces, judiciary, financial institutions and more scarily among our young people.

 West Africa, being a region synonymous to civil wars and proxy military coups fuelled mainly by bad governance, Organized Criminal networks are asserting their influence and control of the region. For example in Guinea Bissau from 2007 to 2011 at the height of the drug trade engineered by Latin American cartels, the street value of the monthly export of cocaine trade to mainly European countries was estimated to worth more than the yearly international aid to that country.

In 2010, an estimated two tons cocaine mule was discovered in the Gambia worth over $1 billion. The alleged owners of the drug being Latin American and some European nationals were apparently prosecuted and jail for more than 50 years.

Over the last three years, in Senegal, Ghana, and Sierra Leone, cargo ships were intercepted on which huge amount of drugs were found. In the desert region of the border between Mali and Niger, a passenger plane was found abandoned and disabled after it was apparently used to smuggle drugs from the desert regions of the Sahara to Northern Europe.

The effects of arms trafficking through Organized Crime has been having its toll on West Africa with often devastating consequences of deaths and untold destruction. Most of these arms are used in the conflicts in the region. In the past two decades alone, West Africa had endured three brutal civil wars in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast with a combine death toll of more than 250 000 people. The current conflict in Northern Nigeria is mainly fuelled thanks to proceeds from organized criminal activities which are particularly used to buy weapons for the Islamists insurgents linked to Al-Qaida.  All these have profound effects on peaceful and democratic politicking in our Sub region..

In conclusion Mr Chairman, distinguished ladies and gentlemen, what is happening in our region regarding insecurity should serve as a wakeup call for all of us. If West Africa and indeed the entire continent is to is to be successful in countering the influence of insecurity on our body politics, the States and indeed “WE” should develop strong interest in establishing just societies, fight corruption in all its forms and manifestations, respect the rule of law, human rights and put in place programmes that will bring about sustainable development and poverty reduction..The alternatives, ladies and gentlemen would continue to be costly for the  sub region in terms 0f  not only the lost of human life but also of property.

Thank you for your kind attention.

FIFTEEN YEARS OF INJUSTICE FOR APRIL 10/11 VICTIMS

April 10, 2015
Reads :370

FIFTEEN YEARS HAS GONE, WHEN 14 INNOCENT STUDENTS PLUS A RED CROSS VOLUNTEER AND A THIRTEEN YEAR OLD CHILD WERE BRUTALLY MASSACRED IN COLD BLOOD BY THE POLICE INTERVENTION UNIT (PIU) OF THE GAMBIA, YET STILL NO JUSTICE HAS BEEN TAKEN PLACE !!!

Needy April 10 and 11 Victims

Needy April 10 and 11 Victims

 

Needy victims of the April 10/11 2000 student demonstrations in the Gambia

Needy victims of the April 10/11 2000 student demonstrations in the Gambia

By Lamin Saddam Sanyang, The Netherlands.

Fifteen  years ago april on the 10th  and 11th  2000 was one of the darkest days of our smiling coast. On the 10th of april 2000, was the day when unarmed students in the greater Banjul area, under the leadership of the Gambia Students Union (GAMSU) decided to stage a peaceful demonstration against a host of grievances including the alleged beating to death of their colleague Ebrima Barry by the officers of the Brikama Fire services,  as well the alleged raping of a thirteen year old  student girl by a member of the security forces at the independent stadium, where an annual inter-schools sports competition was taking place, and five soldiers of the 2nd Battalion were also responsible for the death of two students at Brikamaba.

Ebrima Barry was taken to the station, where his head was shaved, he was beaten, he was forced to carry heavy bags of cement, stripped him naked, poured cement on him, and finally put cement in his mouth and forced him to swallow. Ebrima Barry went home that night and the following day he died from injury. Their peaceful demonstration was violently suppressed by the Gambia security forces whereby fourteen students plus a red cross volunteer and a three (3yr) old child was brutally killed by President Yahya Jammeh’s henchmen and several others were injured and some maimed for the rest of their lives. The students did not back down upon viewing the violent response of government to the protest of their colleagues in the greater Banjul area, several rural towns also launched their protests on the following day April the 11th 2000, they were violently harassed and several hundreds of students were detained country wide. The only crime these innocent young students committed, if they committed one, was peacefully demonstrating their civil, democratic and constitutional rights.  Those unarmed and powerless students supposed to be the tomorrow leaders of our country.  Their rights and lives were deliberately taken away from them without giving them the chance to face justice.

At the day of the demonstration, President Jammeh was out of country. He was called and inform by his vice President Isatou Njie Saidy. The saddest part of the story was the exact words that came out of the stinking mouth of President Jammeh was, GO AND KILL THOSE BASTARD !!!  This is the way President Jammeh ordered to massacre the innocents feature leaders of our country. And yet still you are going around the world telling people, you care about Gambia and her people. How can you murdered our future leaders like an ants and going around and said that you cares The Gambia and her people? You idiot!!! Mr. President, you are nothing but a pathological liar, and all what you represent and  stand for, is selfishness and betrayal to oath.

According to the constitution of the second republic of the Gambia, those students did not committed any crime. Because our constitution says:

“25. FREEDOM OF SPEECH, CONSCIENCE, ASSEMBLY, ASSOCIATION AND MOVEMENT.

(1) Every person shall have the right to –

(a) freedom of speech and expression, which include freedom of the press and other media.

(b) freedom of thought, conscience and belief, which shall include academic freedom.

(c) freedom to practice any religion and to manifest such practice.

(d) freedom to assemble and demonstrate peaceably and without arms.”

 

– Mr. President,  you and your bunch of criminal, have you ever read this section, the constitution is talking about?

– Where are the rights of these fourteen students, a red cross volunteer and a three years old child

who were brutally murdered in daylight without any hesitation?

– M r. President,   are you going to give the same order to massacre them if your daughter Mariama Jammeh and your son Modou Lamin Jammeh are among the demonstrators?

– Mrs/Miss Vice President, the statement you gave after those students were massacred, are those words your own words?

– If those words are yours, will you still use the same words when those victims are your own children?

– If does words are not yours, then who gave it to you?

– Who commanded you to read it?

– Is that statement match with the constitution?

May the souls of the victims of the April 10 and 11 rest in perfect peace and the souls of those past away before and after them.

Ameen

 

DUGA GEARS UP FOR APRIL 10/11 ANNIVERSARY PROTEST

April 5, 2015
Reads :521
DUGA

DUGA

Democratic Union of Gambian Activists, DUGA, is organising a mass protest in Washington DC, on 11 April 2015, to mark the 15 anniversary of the April 10 & 11, 2000, student massacre in the Gambia. The students were killed by Gambian military personnels acting under the command and orders of the Gambian President Yahya Jammeh. Since that fateful date, the Gambian authorities have failed to prosecute any of their indiscipline and irresponsible security personnels responsible for the callous murder of the innocent students and Red Cross volunteer, Omar Barrow.

In the quest for justice for the victims, DUGA is urging all Gambians around the world, especially those in the United States, to join them at Washington DC, to demand justice for the victims of the April 10 & 11, some of whom are still struggling with the disabilities suffered from the event.

Needy April 10 and 11 Victims

Needy April 10 and 11 Victims

Needy victims of the April 10/11 2000 student demonstrations in the Gambia

Needy victims of the April 10/11 2000 student demonstrations in the Gambia

We hereunder publish the DUGA press release:

“Press Release

On April 11, 2015, in Washington, DC, Gambian civil society organizations will hold a protest to  commemorate the 15th anniversary of one of the darkest days in Gambian history, the April  the 10th  and 11th  student massacre.  On this day, the Jammeh regime unleased security forces on students peacefully protesting the rape of a 14 year old student, and the death of another at the hands of security forces.  

This day will be forever be etched in the consciousness of Gambians, and it is only fitting that this day be used, not only to remember the April 2000 victims, but also in remembrance of our gallant freedom fighters of December 30, 2014. 

This protest will also serve as a reminder to the world by highlighting the continued abuses of the Yahya Jammeh regime against the LGBT community, religious leaders, government officials, journalists and the deplorable general human rights situation that affects every sector of Gambian society.

We invite all those who abhor injustice to stand with Gambians on April 11, 2015 in Washington, DC at the White House/Lafayette Park.

Signed,

Coalition for Change Gambia (CCG)

Committee for the Restoration of Democracy in the Gambia (CORDEG)

Democratic Union of Gambians (DUGA-USA)

Democratic Union of Gambians (DUGA-UK)

Gambia Consultative Council (GCC)

Gambia Democratic Action Group (GDAG)

Gambian Movement for Democracy and Development (GMDD) 

National Resistance Movement of the Gambia (NRMG)

Save the Gambia Democracy Project (STGDP)

INDISCIPLINE – THE BANE OF GAMBIAN SOCIETY

April 5, 2015
Reads :555
Book reviewer D. A. Jawo

D. A. Jawo – The author

By D. A. Jawo

Discipline is no doubt the cornerstone of any development strategy, and with its absence, no society can ever achieve any modicum of development. This, unfortunately, is the bane of almost every facet of life in the Gambia, and as long as discipline is not instilled in the society, it is hard to see how Gambians can excel in this highly competitive world, let alone expect President Yahya Jammeh to ever realize his untenable dream of transforming the country into the economic super power of Africa.

However, discipline, like most other virtues, must be a top/bottom approach rather than the reverse. When it does not exist at the top echelons of the society, then it is impossible to impose it from the bottom. That unfortunately is the reality in the Gambia where gross indiscipline seems to pervade every sector; from the very top echelons of the society to the very bottom, and hardly anything is being done to curb it.

During a recent visit to the Gambia, I personally experienced gross indiscipline as well as saw its negative effect on the society. Just to quote a few examples of the numerous encounters I had with the vice; during a visit to one of the local banks to carry out some transaction, the girls at the reception desk were busy chatting amongst themselves and admiring some wares on sale while the customers were waiting on the queue to be served.

I observed that it is a similar situation in almost all other places which provide service to the public. For instance, when I decided to visit the trade fair at the Independence Stadium as early as possible in order to avoid the crowd, and arrived at the Gamtel/Gamcel stand at about 10am to buy something, I found only the night-duty watchman and he said he was waiting for those on duty who were supposed to be at work by 8am, but they never turned up until at about 11am. Of course there were no apologies for turning up late as to them, it was just something normal and it was up to the customers to either wait for them or go away. They apparently did not see or care about the correlation between the success of the business and their lackadaisical attitude to work, as long as at the end of the month, they will receive their full salaries.

However, when such indiscipline is manifested at the very top echelons of the society, it usually costs the public quite dearly. A good case in point is the two ‘new’ ferries; Aljamdu and Kansala, which were bought almost three years ago and are still anchored at the Banjul wharf, apparently because they are not suitable to operate on the route. One can imagine the millions of Dalasis of public money that may have been spent in purchasing them only to be left idle and deteriorating for this long without benefiting the public who continue to cross the Banjul/Barra stretch in unseaworthy ferries which are now dubbed as ‘floating coffins’, with no doubt a disaster of unimaginable proportion waiting to happen.

In any other civilized country, whoever had been responsible for such waste of public resources would have accounted for it, but in the Gambia, as long as anything involves President Jammeh or members of his cabal, then no one would dare to question it let alone demand for an explanation.

Still on the Banjul/Barra ferries, the last time I visited the Gambia, I pointed out in an open letter to the management of the Gambia Ports Authority about their unhygienic conditions and the lack of sanitation on board for the people who use them on a daily basis. While this time round I observed some slight improvements, but the situation is still far from satisfactory.

However, to compare the situation at the Banjul/Barra ferry crossing with what obtains elsewhere, I had the opportunity to use the ferry at Foundiougne in Senegal to cross the Saloum River to Fatick while on my way to Dakar, and apart from the absence of the chaos and disorderliness associated with the Banjul/Barra ferries, the services at that place are also much more superior. In addition to the noticeable cleanliness of the ferry and its punctuality, there is also maximum security guaranteed to all the passengers by providing each with a life-jacket.

One would therefore wonder why, taking the poor mechanical conditions of the Banjul/Barra ferries, the Gambian authorities have not seen it fit to provide safety gear such as life-jackets on board the ferries. This is not only another apparent manifestation of indiscipline at the very top, but also lack of regard for the safety and welfare of the people who use those ferries on a daily basis.

Unlike the chaos and disorderliness that obtain at the terminals at both Banjul and Barra where vehicle owners are often said to pay bribes in order to cross or risk spending several nights on the queue, at Foundiougne, vehicles cross on a first come, first-served basis which hardly leaves any room for bribery and corruption. While in the Gambia certain individuals, particularly militants and supporters of the APRC are often given priority over all other motorists, at the Foundiougne crossing, all vehicles must join the queue and can only cross when it is their turn to do so. That is an example of discipline.

Another notable thing in the Gambia is the frequent power cuts which also seem to last forever. We can still vividly recall during celebrations of the July 22nd “Revolution” in 1996, President Jammeh, then as Chairman of the AFPRC, promised that if by the next July there was no 24 hour electricity supply throughout the country, there would be no celebrations of the “Revolution”. However, almost 19 years later, the situation has become even worse. It therefore sounds like a big joke to hear him constantly talk about transforming the Gambia into an economic super power by 2025 that would surpass such economic giants like Dubai and Singapore. It would have indeed made more sense for his regime to first tackle such socio-economic problems by guaranteeing Gambians the most basic services before making such untenable pronouncements.

There are also the numerous irritating road blocks and military check-points which cause so much unnecessary disruption in the people’s movements. One would really wonder what such check points are intended to achieve apart from contributing to the air of frustration and despondency that seems to grip the whole country.

Another matter of concern to most Gambians is the sorry state of the capital, Banjul. I can recall that when I first came to Banjul in the mid-60s as a school boy, then the city was very neat and orderly, with most of the streets paved and swept on a daily basis by gangs of municipal workers.

However, today, one can hardly see a paved street in Banjul, and even the few streets still left with some traces of tar, potholes; some the sizes of craters, can be seen all over, with rubbish heaps virtually everywhere. At the same time, virtually all the public amenities that the city used to boast of have either now been relocated to the Kombos or left to deteriorate. Also, while there used to be almost daily rubbish collection by the municipality, it is now no longer the case. Residents are nowadays compelled to find alternative means of disposing off their trash rather than wait for it to be collected by the infrequent rubbish trucks.

Therefore, one would wonder what the Banjulians have got in return for their almost total submission to the ruling APRC which now controls the city’s three constituencies as well as all the municipal wards.

AS JAMMEH GOVERNMENT HANDED TREASON SENTENCE TO DECEMBER 30 HEROES; PATA PJ ARGUES JAMMEH TOO MUST BE TRIED FOR TREASON!

April 1, 2015
Reads :1172
This man in Red Beret knows how to make up a story!

This man in Red Beret has also committed treason, but who will try him!

A military court martial handed death sentences in the Gambia? http://www.faturadio.com/index.php/en/component/k2/item/583-death-sentence-handed-down-on-coup-suspects-in-the-gambia. No surprises here but still saddens me that Yaya Jammeh continues to find avenues to kill people for the same crime that he’d committed on July 22, 1994. The secret court martial gotta be bogus!

Yaya and his gang of unruly bandits picked up arms to overthrow a constitution, promulgate military decrees that gave them the blank check to reign terror on Gambians, a thing that continued even after the (formal) military rule.

You’re a disingenuous #hypocrite if you see a problem with anybody wanting to oust Yaya and his administration through a coup but you’re OK with Jammeh. He confiscated power thru an illegitimate mean which makes his mandate illegitimate. And spare me the ‘two wrongs can’t make a right’ shit.

The reason rape is awfully criminal is because the perpetrator denies the victim the right to consent. They force themselves on them. That’s what Jammeh and AFPRC did to the Gambia some two decades ago!

Villains of Dictatorship

Singhateh, Touray, Jammeh, Sabally, Hydara

Yahya Jammeh, Sana Sabally, Edward Singhateh, Yankuba Touray and Sadibou Hydara ARE ALL GUILTY OF TREASON should be prosecuted and punished fittingly.

My heart is broken for these guys especially Modou Njie. My prayers for them and their families.

Pata PJ.