GAMBIA: DOCTORS REFUTE ALLEGATIONS ON A ROADSIDE ACCIDENT VICTIM

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Entrance to A&E section EFSH  Banjul – Photo credit: mapio.net

Allegations of medical personnel not responding to a patient of a roadside accident at the Accident and Emergency (A&E) section of a hospital in Gambia because of lack of a police report which resulted in the death of the patient have stormed social media in the past couple of days.  The story emanated from the Facebook feed of one Malima Ceesay who expressed her disdain on how medical personnel at the said hospital did not respond to a dying patient of a roadside accident because of lack of a police report. She lamented that the patient who is the sister of her best friend, a young girl was bleeding seriously from the head because of the accident was not attended to because of the absence of a police report. The report by Malima angered Gambians around the world and many people took to social media to express their outrage or disgust over the incident.  However according to reports feeding in two Doctors; Kebba S. Bojang and Khalifa Kassama have refuted such allegations.

Doctors; Kebba S. Bojang and Khalifa Kassama have both vehemently refuted the narration that the young lady was left to die because of the absence of a police report.  Both Doctors remarked that the lady in question was brought in dead (BID).  Dr. Kalipha  Kassama said he was on the ground when it all happened, when the body was brought in as a BID with a terrible head injury and because such a body can’t  be taken to the death house without any police officer witnessing that was why the issue of involving the police came in.

Dr. Kebba S. Bojang dispelled Malima Ceesay’s assertion that medical personnel present were; a nurse who spent five minutes wearing her gloves and her supposed supervisor whom the nurse consulted on the matter. He pointed out that  when the victims were brought to the A&E, not just a nurse was on the ground, there were two doctors there too; one for surgical department and another for pediatric department.  He buttressed that the said victim was brought in dead (BID) because knowing the gravity of her injuries she would have died on the spot at the scene.

Dr. Bojang went on to lament that if Malima understood the way the TRIAGE SYSTEM works at A&E, he/she would have understood why nobody had to ‘rush’ to the victim when she was brought in after the initial assessment and that the second victim who was brought in with the deceased was treated accordingly and later released to go home.

We hope that the ministry of health and the police would collaborate appropriately to maximize patient welfare and in communicating effectively to the general public to clear doubts in such kind of controversies.

 

Written by L.Nyassi, Olso


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